Farm to Fire Cooking With Tournant

In collaboration with Tournant, we bring you two new open-fire brunch recipes. Tournant is a farm-to-fire approach to cooking created by chefs Mona and Jaret, who met while working at Portland Farmers Market. Tournant celebrates time, place, and purpose where the meals are often served outdoors in nature and are guided by the seasons and local bounty from land and sea. These dining experiences create a space to slow down, connect, savor the moment, and create lasting memories. From the culinary genius of Mona and Jaret of Tournant, here are two open-fire brunch recipes to add to your arsenal.


Recipe 1: Cowboy Shakshuka

Smoky cowboy beans are transformed into a new take on the one-pan brunch phenomenon known as shakshuka, with eggs poached right in the saucy, spicy beans that are loaded with plenty of bacon. Bring in extra fire flavor by garnishing with ember-roasted poblano peppers and deeply charred onions and tomatoes.

Ingredients: Serves 4

  • 4 cups cooked red beans in their cooking liquid

  • 3 poblano peppers

  • 8 slabs thick cut bacon

  • 1 cup sofrito, recipe to follow

  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed

  • 4 tablespoons harissa

  • 1/2 cup white wine

  • 2 cups tomato puree

  • 2 dried morita or chipotle chiles, optional but delicious

  • 3 Roma or small regular tomatoes, quartered

  • 1 red onion, quartered

  • 4 eggs

  • Sea salt and flaky finishing salt

  • Extra virgin olive oil

  • Garnishes: feta, parsley, and harissa or your favorite hot sauce

  • Grilled bread for serving

Sofrito Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup olive oil

  • 4 medium yellow onions, peeled, halved and thinly sliced

  • 1/2 cup tomato puree

  • Sea salt

Preparation (especially if cooking in the wild):

The Day Before:

  • Shop for all ingredients.

  • If cooking beans from dried: first soak for 6-12 hours, simmer until tender, season with salt and chill in their cooking liquid.

  • Make and reserve sofrito.

The Day Of:

  • Transfer ingredients into a cooler.

  • Gather essentials to start and maintain a fire safely, such as: newspaper or fatwood, matches or a lighter, kindling, dry firewood, a shovel, long-handled tongs for moving burning logs and embers, sturdy gloves, fire-extinguisher or water for safety and putting out embers at the end of the day.

  • Cooking equipment: cast iron 8 quart Dutch oven with lid, large cast iron skillet or griddle, wooden spoon for stirring and serving, metal fish spatula (or other thin, flexible spatula), long handled tongs for roasting peppers, cutting board, sharp knife, a selection of bowls, trays and spoons for prepping and cooking, plates, napkins and utensils for eating.

Instructions For Sofrito:

Heat olive oil over medium high heat in a Dutch oven or other heavy-bottomed pan. Add onions and a few pinches of salt, then cook, covered, stirring occasionally until onions begin to soften and release their liquid.


Lower heat to medium low and cook onions, uncovered, stirring often and adding a splash of water occasionally if sticking to the pan, until onions are completely melted, a deep golden brown, and caramelized.


Add tomato puree and cook until thickened, then season with salt, cool and refrigerate until needed.

Instructions For Shakshuka:

Build a good fire with dry wood and allow to burn down to hot coals. Place poblano peppers directly on hot coals and cook, turning often, until skins are blackened and charred on all sides.


Remove poblanos from heat and allow to rest until cool enough to handle, and then scrape off charred skin with a clean towel or dull side of a knife. Remove and discard stem, slice in half, remove and discard seeds, slice or tear into bite-sized pieces and reserve.


Cut 4 slabs of bacon in half for garnish and the other 4 slabs into lardons (sliced crosswise into 1/4 inch strips).


Using an 8 quart Dutch oven, set over a low fire, render slab bacon halves until crisp. Remove and set aside. Add bacon lardons and cook until rendered and just beginning to brown.


Stir in sofrito, crushed garlic cloves, and harissa and cook for 2 minutes, then add white wine and reduce by half.


Add tomato puree and cook until bubbling, then add cooked red beans along with a 1/2 cup or so of cooking liquid (reserve the rest if needed for thinning sauce) and dried chilies, then cover and simmer for 10-15 minutes until reduced slightly and thickened to your liking. Season to taste with salt.


Meanwhile, sear the tomato and onion quarters on a cast iron griddle or in a large cast iron skillet over medium high heat on all cut sides until tender and nicely charred. Slice root end from onion quarters, separate into individual “petals” and set aside.


Once beans are cooked and the sauce is thick and simmering gently, lay in poblano pepper pieces. Using a spoon, make four divots and gently crack eggs into each divot. Season eggs with salt, cover with lid, carefully pile some hot coals on top and cook for about 4-5 minutes until egg whites are just set. Remove coals from lid and lift off using tongs or heat proof gloves.


Tuck in reserved bacon slices, tomatoes, and charred onion petals, cover with lid, cover again with hot coals and cook for 1-2 minutes more until everything is hot and bubbling and eggs are cooked to your liking. Remove from heat, drizzle generously with extra virgin olive oil and sprinkle with flaky finishing salt.


Garnish with crumbled feta, parsley leaves, and more harissa or your preferred hot sauce. Serve with toasted bread for sopping up the sauce.


Kitchen Notes from the Chefs:

We used a lovely Rancho Gordo heirloom bean variety called Hidatsa Red Beans, but any small red bean will do. Cooking your own beans is highly recommended but you can also substitute with two cans of red beans.


Recipe 2: Cast Iron Herb Frittata with Spring Vegetables

Loaded with herbs and topped with a crown of verdant spring vegetables, this fire-baked frittata celebrates the freshness of the season. Make it extra decadent by adding a melty wedge of triple cream cheese and salty ribbons of prosciutto, or skip these flavor bombs for a lighter, brighter dish.

Ingredients: Serves 4-6

  • 8 eggs

  • 1/2 cup heavy cream

  • 1/2 cup finely grated parmesan cheese

  • 1 cup finely chopped soft herbs (such as chives, dill, parsley, tarragon and mint, plus more for garnish)

  • 1/2 cup chopped green garlic or scallions, both white and green portions

  • 1 cup asparagus, cut into 1 inch pieces

  • 1/2 cup sugar snap peas, cut on the diagonal into 1/2 inch pieces

  • 1/2 cup blanched fiddlehead ferns or English peas

  • Splash of white wine

  • Wedge of your favorite triple crème cheese

  • 4 paper-thin slices of prosciutto

  • Sea salt and flaky salt

  • Ghee or olive oil, for cooking

  • Garnishes: soft herbs, pea shoots, fresh lemon zest, extra virgin olive oil

Preparation (especially if cooking in the wild):

The Day Before:

  • Shop for all ingredients

  • If desired, prep herbs and vegetables

The Day Of:

  • Whisk eggs in a bowl with cream and cheese, season with salt and transfer to a mason jar with lid.

  • Transfer ingredients into a cooler.

  • Gather everything needed to start and maintain a fire safely, such as: newspaper or fatwood, matches or a lighter, kindling, dry firewood, a shovel, long-handled tongs for moving burning logs and embers, sturdy gloves, fire-extinguisher or water for safety and putting out embers at the end of the day.

  • Cooking equipment: cast iron 4 quart Dutch oven with lid, cast iron skillet for sautéing vegetables, wooden spoon or spatula, cutting board, and sharp knife (if prepping vegetables and herbs onsite), Microplane for zesting lemon, a selection of bowls, trays, and spoons for prepping and cooking, plates, napkins and utensils for eating.

Instructions:

Build a good fire with dry wood and allow to burn down to hot coals. Heat a cast iron skillet over medium heat and add a tablespoon of ghee or oil. Add green garlic or scallions and sauté a minute or two until softened and fragrant. Add asparagus and sugar snaps and sauté until tender and crisp, and then add fiddleheads or peas and a splash of white wine.


Season with salt, allow wine to simmer away and then remove from heat and reserve. Pre-heat Dutch oven in the coals to medium heat.


Add chopped herbs to mason jar of egg mixture and shake well to distribute. Add a tablespoon of ghee or oil to heated Dutch oven and swirl to coat pan. Add egg mixture to Dutch oven (eggs will sizzle) and cook until edges begin to set, about 3-5 minutes.


Move Dutch oven off coals and, using a shovel, carefully pile hot coals on top of the lid. This creates top-down heat which simulates cooking in an oven. Cook for about 5-7 minutes, then carefully remove coals and lift lid with tongs or heat-proof gloves. The frittata should be cooked through (a tip of a knife will come out clean) and beginning to puff. If it needs more time, replace lid and top with more coals until cooked through.


When frittata is just cooked through, top with wedge of cheese and ribbons of prosciutto (if desired), then return lid to Dutch oven. Carefully top with coals and cook for another minute or so to allow cheese to begin melting.


Meanwhile, heat reserved vegetables in the cast iron pan. Remove coals and lid from Dutch oven and spoon vegetables on top, allowing the cheese and prosciutto to peek through.


Garnish with flaky salt, soft herbs, pea shoots and fresh lemon zest. Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil and serve.


Kitchen Notes from the Chefs:

We used Délice de Bourgogne, but other triple crème cheeses (such as Brillat-Savarin, Saint Andre, or Fromager D’Affinois) would be equally delicious. You could also substitute with ricotta, chèvre, or crème fraiche, scooped on immediately before serving.


Visit the Tournant website to explore their food traditions, get their Fire Cookbook Series, or to gather around their table.

7,183 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All